Teton Chronicle (Choteau, Mont.) 1897-1901, September 02, 1898, Image 3

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THIS YEAR’S WOOL CLIP. The wool season in. Montana is virtually over, though at the various shipping points there is yet a oou- 1 sidorablo quantity of wool which the owners are holding for various reasons, principally because thoy^ are of the opinion that in GO days they will get more money for it than they would if they were to let it go now. This has been the best year tho r Montana wool growers have had for a long time, and one of the best in tho history of the industry -in tho state. The growers have in some other years received more for their wool, but all the conditions have not been so favorable. They have not only done well with their wool, but what is of greatest importance in the business, they are assured of an abundance o f feed through the com iug winter, which they will be able to > provide at a low cost, owing to the immense hay crop. As a rulo the lamb crop is good, and sheep will go into the winter in fine couditiou. not ouly has wool brought a good figure, but sheep of all sorts are bringing good prices, and the pros­ pect is that the market will keep up r for a loug time. While estimates of the wool clip vary from 20,000,000 to 25,000,000 pounds as the total clip of Montana this year, a conservative estimate puts it at 22,500,000 pounds. The grater part of this wool hasgoneeast, either having been sold direct, or on consignment. There is still two or three million pounds in the state, representing the clip of big com­ panies who can afford to hold, and who are of the opinion that. 20 cents is about the figure they will get if they wait a little longer. The top price of the year, so far as reported, was 18 cents and at that figure a number of sales were made. The price during the season ran from that figure down to 14 ceuts, which was the lowest for average clips. , Taking the season through, and the price, it may be said that the average for .the clip of the state has been 15| cents a pound, which was better than • the growers expected to receive when the season opened and higher than a great majority bad placed their figures. For a fact, Montana wool growers as a rule put their price at 15 cents. Early in the season some sold at 14 ceuts. But that price did not rule long, and it soon went up to 15 cents. Then it went to 16 ceuts, ■* then to 16£ aud later to 17 cents. Many of the growers claim even at tho lattor price the buyers in Mon­ tana did not pay the eastern price, aud contend that there was a combi­ nation among the representatives of eastern houses by which they were forced to sell for a cent or two under the eastern market. However that may be, it is a fact that the Montana wool grower this year received more for his wool than did the grower in any of the other northwestern states. In Colorado and Utah, where the season is in ad­ vance of that in Montana, the buyers got tho wool for from 10 to 12 ceuts, while in Wyoming the latter was a ruling figure. While the difference in price in 4 favor of the Montana wool grower was due in part to the better condition of tho eastern market, that is not al­ together {lie reason Montana wool commanded a so much better price. The fact is that while Colorado and Utah have been trying for the past five years to breed mutton sheep and have succeeded, it has been at tho expense of the wool. On the other hand, Moutana growers have been all the while improving their flocks for the wool product, and the result is that now Moutana wool ranks far ahead of that produced in neighbor­ ing states. That is one reason why Montana growers received moro for their clip this year than growers in other states, aud another was the wool was in fine condition. The ? spring rains washed it thoroughly on the sheeps’ backs and when the buy­ ers sampled it they found a nice, bright, clean article that was safe to buy, because it would appeal to the eastern manufacturer.—Heleua In dependant. wolf I will pay market price for and coyote bounty certificates. J ohn H obbins . Office at Burds Storo. To Whip Anyrhiug Afloat. The navy department will ask «in­ gress'to authorize the construction o tho largest aud most formidable bat­ tleships and cruisers afloat—vessels without cquals iu any foroigu fleets aud incomparably superior in (Offen­ sive ~Oliver, speed aud endurance to any of the uiaguificeut ships which a few weeks ago destroyed Corvera’s squadron. The decision, reached at a meeting of the naval board of con­ struction a week ago, will be urged upon congress for prompt ac­ tion,-supported by arguments of tho most achieving character. The board practically agreed to begin the designs of three battleships of between 13,000 aud 14,000 tons displacement, with at least nineteen knots maintained speed, a radical advance from the 11,525-ton sixteen- knot ships of tho Alabama and Keav sarge class, which now represent the maximum-powered unite of the Amer ican navy. It was also determined to recommeud three first-class cruis­ ers of about 12,000 tons and of not less than twenty-two knots speed, nearly half again as large as tho New York and Brooklyu, and of from three to four knots greater speed. In addition to these a class of protected and partly armored cruisers of be tween 5,000 and 6,000 tons, similar to the Olympia, Admiral Dewey’s flagship, but of much higher speed, was favorably considered, as well as a new class of 2,500-ton cruisers, a little larger than the Detroit and the Marblehead aud smaller thau the At­ lanta aud the Boston. Every member of the board warm­ ly endorsed the necessity of sheath­ ing every one of these vessels in the interest of speed and economy, and :o have them practically independ­ ent of dry docks. They will, thero- oro, be the best sheathed vessels in he United States fleet. The mem­ bers of the board are of the opinion :hat no more important naval lesson las been learned from the recent war than that the rapid deteriora­ tion below the water line of warships in tropical waters through the accum­ ulation of marine growth upon their=hulls, reducing thoir speed in every iustance, after a few months, more than 25 per cent., and in some instances as high as 60 per cent. The question of gun calibers and armor on the new battleships and irst-class cruisers is still unsettled, out the chief of ordinance, Captain O’Neill, who is president of the poard, auuouuced his readiness to agree to a maximum caliber of 12 inches, if thereby a more widely ex­ tended disposition of armor could bo obtained, with grater speed aud greater coal endurance. He also fa­ vored an attempt to secure tho un­ precedented speed of twonty-four mots for the hugh armored cruisers aud a minimum of twenty knots for the battleships. The battleships will be designed to whip any fighting vessel in the world, of whatever class, and the cruisers are to be more formidable ;hau any vessel of their speed de­ signed up to this time in Europe. Tho board made no reference to tor­ pedo boats, and is not disposed to recommend any further increase of he 51 vessels of that typo now built or authorized. Proposals for. Building Bridge. . Skilled proposals will.-.bo ..received at (.tie office of tho unrtcrsigiiod at Chotoau. Teton 'county, Montana, uutil „10. ft. m. Tuesday, Soptenibcr (Jth. 1893, for tlie :c6nstruction of-a steel or iron bridge over the Manas river, at a poiut near James A. Johnson’s ranch on tho roadfrom Poudorn to Shelby. High water width of river, two hundred and sixty feet. Width of roadway of bridge,' sixteen feet, height of ro idway over rivor, atieast nine foot. Length of pile approach on south sido about two hundred and iifty foot-, together with tho necessary grades at each cad. ‘‘Proposals to bo ondorsod ‘ ‘Proposals for bridge and bidders must accompany their bids with full and com­ plete plans and specifications o f said proposed bridge; also by a certified chock in favor of Teton county for 5 per cent\ of the amouut of the bid as an earnest of good faith. No bids will be considered unless accompani­ ed by full and complete plans and specifications. Tho successful bidder will bo required to enter into a written contrac.t, binding himself to con­ struct said bridge in accordance with tho plans and specifications, and give a bond, with local securities, in a sum double tho contract price, conditioned ou tho faithful performance o f said contract. The right to reject any aud all bids is reserved. By ordor of the board of commissioners of Teton county. A. C. W akxer , County Clerk. Chotcau, Montana, July-28.1S08. I m . h . o r m s b y , a • » LOST Three Dun mares, branded L ou eft side of neck, aud two yearling colts not branded. A liberal reward will bo paid for the return of same. E. H. L awrence , tf Chalmers’ Ranch, Burton THE HOUSE, H. BEAUPRE, PROP. First class in every respect. Board by day.or week at rea sa st a a a a a a a a a a a lOHOTEAU, a a a a a a a.. a a a aHorse Shoeing... «5 B B B B B B B B B B B e E E R E MONTANA.! B E E E E K \ I K B E B E IT! SpecialtyE S E B E E S E EBEEEB EE E E EE E E E EE E B H. W. YEAGER Announces that his will be started about SEPT. 15th, and that he will be better equipped ;heu ever to handle the crops of Oats, Wheat and Barley of his Patrons of ast year, and of as mauy other farm­ ers as will give hitn their work. He las purchased a New Case Separat­ or aud will guarantee his .work. 3 CENTS STRAIGHT for Wheat. Oats and Barley. CENTRAL B U C K S ! Thoroughbred Shrop­ shire and Grade Bucks FOR SALE ...A T... LOWRY, MONT. Flowerree’s Sheep & Horse Co. C. II. DUNLAP, Proprietor. WHOLESALE AND RETAIL BUTCHER. sona nie rates. Beef, Mutton, Pork and Veal Sausage. • Fish, Game and Poultry in Season. OHOTEAU, MONTANA. GLAB & GI ES, GREAT FALLS, MONT. Wholosnle Dealers in Bottlers of all Kinds of ani Mineral Walers — Bar Glassware. D. A. RICHARDSON, Live Slock and Ranches a Specialty. —Sheep & Cattle for Sale— GREAT FALLS, MONTANA- OPPOSITE PARK HOTE. JOE ARNOLD... o Carpenter — A N D- C ONTRACTO R Estimates Cheerfully Furnishotl. Burial j Caskots to Ordor on Short Notice. J ■ I D is New, Substantial AND Well Finished We have an assortment which gives ample room for choice, aud the Qual­ ity is from good to best, with price the lowest. W e Can Make You and Your Home Comfortable. We sell ouly such goods as wo kuow to be reliable from ovory stand­ point. . A.P.CURTIN &CQ. ------ THE BIG STORE------ Q — ►Shop ou Uppor Main St., Chotcau. GREAT FALLS, MONTANA. 2 2 CH 0 TEAU h o u s e ! \ W m . T T o d g s k L iss, T?rop> j Centrally Located and the Best Accommodations of any House in the County. Service and Cuisine surpassed by no other House. ---------------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------— u o r s S L n .d C i g a r s Furnished for the Convenience of its Customers. Livery and Feed Stable Run in Connection. Largest and most Convenient Barn in Town. Careful and Painstaking man in \ charge. Reasonable Charges. QaaaQaHaaaaaaaQaBaaaataaaQaaaaaaaaaaiaaaayaaaayaaaaKaaa T^lacksmith Supplies And Eastern Coal. Ranch Supplies . aud Sheep Camp Oatfits, Tents, Rope, Sheep Paint, House Paints, Stock Saddles aud Harness of all Kinds. Special Attention given to Mail Orders. GREAT FALLS HARDWARE CO., Agents for “ Gidgee” Sheep Shears ........ Great Falls, Montana. E E E E E E E Q E E E E E a E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E B E E E E E E E E E E O E E E E a tí tí tí « E3 e tí Id Ö tí tí U a y y y y y y a y y y y y o y y tí y TM G oodrich L umber C o |' Great Falls & Collins, Mont. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all kinds of Lumber and Building Material, including Lath, Shingles, Flooring, Ceiling, Siding, Finishing Lumber, Nails, Hardware, etc., at Great Falls. W e carry the Largest stock Stock in Northern Montana. Factory in connection for special work. CALL, WRITE, TELEPHONE^**' OR TELEGRAPH US. aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaBaBaaaaaaaaaaaasaaaaBaaaasasaaaa 3 B 'HE ¿IERICÁN J r EWING (joMPANY, BREWERS & BOTTLERS OF L a g e r B e e r . y y u ß y y tí tí tí c tí y e- tí tí y y n y G\eat Falls, Montana, b * u y On tap at all leading resorts in Choteau. ' ta E EEEEEEEQEEEEEEEEEEEEaaEEHEEEEiaaUiiaaEEEEEEEEEEESEDEEES'

Teton Chronicle (Choteau, Mont.), 02 Sept. 1898, located at <http://montananewspapers.org/lccn/sn85053028/1898-09-02/ed-1/seq-3/>, image provided by MONTANA NEWSPAPERS, Montana Historical Society, Helena, Montana.