Teton Chronicle (Choteau, Mont.) 1897-1901, November 25, 1898, Image 2

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THÉ TETOMÏÏRONICLE. 4 r J Y 1 / \ \ i • • BY JOH N E. LOW. Published ovory Friday ^at Choteau, Tbton .. .Comity,¡'Montana. _________ ; ( j j l ; _____ t ________ ■ ____ ÉuU.Tcd aC tha- post-cufico at Cbotoau, Mon- , tiina, as socond class matte-r. Subscription $2.1)0 per annum. Advertising rates on application. ALL ADVERTISING BILLS. PAYABLE TIIE 1ST OF EACH MONTH. .FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1S9S The Sixth Legislative A s s e m b ly. There, is no question about demo­ cratic responsibility for the acts of the sixth legislative assembly of Mon­ tana. Because of its overwhelming majority in both, branches of the legislature, democracy can not oven share the responsibility with any other party, and it will not seek to do so. Tho republicans have' elected four senators, and these, with ono hold over, will give them five votes in that body, in tho house they will have but 1U members out of tlie 70 elected. A total of fourteen senators and repres­ entatives is all the republicans secur­ ed in the late ballotiug, which may be taken' as a fair indication of the rebuke administered to Senator Carter. We hold it us' fortuiiato that the democratic party has complete con­ trol of tho legislative and executive branches of state government. It will mean a return to democratic simplie ity ami,to sound and conservative legislation. This is assured by the character of t lie imm who will make, up that body. They are, as a rule, representative citizens of the state, ami among them are many of tho ablest, and most sagacious leaders of tbe young democracy of Montana. Tho Sixth legislative assembly will excel in all essential particulars any like body chosen since Montana became a state, and 1 lie Independent has no doubt its record as a law making body will bo of like excellence. Tho standing aud character of tho men who will be leaders on Jhq floor of either house are an assurance that no loose or vicious legislation will be able to mu the ganllot. The legislative halls will be a chilly place for the professional lobhiost- ihis winter. There will bo few glad bauds extended to him, aud he will bo lucky if he is not requested by resolution to keep without tho bar of tho house and sonato. Tho Sixth legislative assembly may bo counted upon to stand for con eorvatism aud true economy. The clerks will not bb so thick around the halls and lobbies as to stumble over each other. Reform in this direction will be promptly put in force. The committoes that do not need dorks will not bo provided with them sim­ ply for ornamental purposes. 1 Tho question of fees and salunos for public officials will bo considered in a fair aud conservative way and such ;>diou take.u, in the interest of ecouomy, as the situation demands. No lobby will bo able to prevent proper action in this particular and the salary bill will bo neither lost, strayed or stolen. There will be no timo wasted on * * : * • n • . { woman suffrage or the referendum. These questions and otbersmbf •; their kind will bo relegated to the. debat- ing dubs. The more important affairs-of state, looking to.the amend­ ment of exist iug statutes, as needed, aud to slidi new and ; ptaetiele legislation as tho conditions demand, will engross tho attention of the members. -! ; Ouo of tbe early duties ..to devolve iipon the Sixth legislative assembly will be the blectiou of a Un'itM States senator to'succeed Leo Mantle. The gentleman who may lie chosen '• will bo a domberat, a silver inau and ouo who will not betray, tho people of Montana. —Helena Independent. The United States Senate. It is useless to deny that tho cause of silver got no slight blow’ in tho re­ sults of the late election so far as tho United States senate is concerned. We have lost some strong silver, men there such as Turpio, of Indiana,and Allen, of Nebraska, though most of tho Ipsses in..thp'..feenate to the. re­ publicans were seats held by gold democrats, so called. As far as that goqsjsilvgip'nien wApld just about as soon sco their places tilled with avow­ ed republicans as men masquerading under tho name of democracy, aud voting With the republicans whenever the interest's; of the money power demanded it. The following table shows how tho next senate will stand between the republicans and .the opposition. It concedes all the .ad­ ministration silver republicans such as Shoup, of Idaho, Chandler, of New Hampshire, aud Kyle of South Dakota, who was elected by populist aud republican votes aud calls him­ self an “ independent,” to tho republi­ can column. The opposition com­ prises 30 ‘ ‘emoerats, three populists and three silver men, Teller, Stewart and Jones. The republicans are given every possible advantage in this table. Probably it would be hard to fiud any parly question on which their strongtb would equal that conceded them with the possible exception of sanate organization. Here is tbe table: R. O. Alabama .................................. 2 Arkansas ................................... 2 California ........................... 2 Colorado............................. 1 I Connecticut ....................... 2 Delaware .......................... 1 1 Florida ...................................... 2 Cont-id:! . ................................... 2 ............ Idaho ................ ............... 1 1 Illinois ........... ............... 2 . . Indiana ............. ................ 2 . . Iowa .................. ) . . T\ h t i ............. ............... 1 1 Kem ucky.... 1 J Louisiana ......... 2 Maine............... ............... 2 • . Marylaud .... ................. 2 * . Massachusetts.. ................ 2 . . Michigan........... ............... 2 . . Minnesota ......... . . Mississippi.... ........... . . 2 Missouri ........... 2 Montana ........... ................ 1 1 Nebraska ....... ............... 2 . . Nevada ............. 2 New Hampshire o • . • . New Y o r k .... . ................ 2 *. • North Carolina. ................. ] 1 North Dakota.. ................. 2 • . Ohio .................. ................ 2 • « Oregon ............. ................. 2 * . Pennsylvania... ................ 2 • . Rhode Lslaud.. ................. 2 « . South Carolina. ........................ 2 South Dakota.. ................. 1 1 Tennessee...... 2 Texas......... ... 2 Utah ................ 2 Vermont ........... '> . . Virginia ........... 2 Washington.... ............. ' 1 1 West Virginia.. ................ 1 l Wisconsin ....... ............... 2 • * Wyoming ......... ................ 2 Total ........... ............. 51 36 Republican majority, LS. A close study of this table will show that.it is not by any means sure that a .gold standard-currency bill could pass the sonate during the next two years. There are for in­ stance,several republican senators like Ktiuto Nelson, of Minnesota, and Foraker, of Ohio, who, while opposed to free silver by independent action are also on record as opposing any gold standard legislation. There are also at least nine republican senators in the list who have declared them­ selves as favoriug the theory of bi­ metallism. There is no comfort in the change in tho senate from a silver standpoint, but yet it is not bo solidly gold standard as some of our con­ temporaries would havo us believe. What is tho chance of reversing the political complexion of thesenato two years from now? That is a questiou fraught with the deopest intorest to silver men. Mauy silly aud pessimis­ tic assertions are being inado of the hopelessness of democratic control of the senate for many yoars to come by alleged silver meu who are oither ignorant of the facts, or have a selfish reason for painting the pros­ pects as darkly as possible. Here.aro tho facts in a nutshell. Two years from now’ tho terms oE 30 senators will, expire. Of these 17 are republi­ can, 11 are democrats, one populist aud the other a silver republican. Tho democrats whoso terms expire then aro • from Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Louis iana, - Mississippi,- South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia, states that can be relied upon to return democratic successors. - The republicans whoso terms, ex­ pire in 1901 aro from Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa,.. Kansas, Maine, Mas­ sachusetts. Michigan, Minnesota, Montaua, Nebraska, Now Hampshire, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island, West Virginia and Wyoming. Tho populist is Marion Butler, of North Carolina, and the silver republican is R. F. Pettigrew, of South Djkota. The only stato where it is at all possible for tho democrats to lose a senator in 190.1 is Delaware, and that was carried by Bryan in 1896 Counting that democrats hold their own wo have seven states where the chances are altogether in favor of their winning seats from the republi­ cans. They are Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska. West Virginia, Kansas and Wyoming. That would reduce the republican majority to four, counting Kyle as a republican. There would still remain the states of Illinois, Michigan. New Hamp­ shire, New Jersey and Oregon in which republican senators retire, and in which democrats have a fighting show at least to win. If they carriod two out of the five they would havo wiped out the republican majority in tho senate. A considerable smaller measure of success thau this would insure the passage of a free coinage bill, as Kyle aud other counted re­ publicans would undoubtedly vote for it. A sweeping victory for Bryan in 1900 is likely to carry both houses of congress in with a clear democratic silver majority.—Great Falls Tribune. Montana Brewing Go; • iy j Brewers aud Bottlers of Eitra Pals .Lager lit .Kegs anil Bottles. All Orders for Keg and Bottled Beer promptly attended to. P. 0. Box 76\! Phone 210. Great Falls, Montana. T he H otel Q rane ) Formerly The Grand Central . . Hates $1.50 per Day. Special Rates to 'Families. This Hotel is under Now Management, with al,l tlio Latest Modern Im­ provements, well lighted Sample Rooms, Superior Service aud Cuisi'tie’ Rooms with Bath en Suite as Moderato Charges. • Free Carriages meet all Traina- THOS. REYNOLDS, . Prop^ ________ G - r ea t F a l l s , , _____________ ,I^Coxita.Tia^ GREAT ~FALLS HOTEL --------- Formerly the Uim House -------- * ‘ htilPLETILY REFURNISHED ■ AND REMATSD.; Steam Heat and Electric Light in1 every Room. Free Oai - riages Meet all Trains. Rates, $2 Per Day. Tables First Class. . BEN STEELE, W . H. CLARKE, , • Chief Clerk. Proprietor E D . M c G U iR K \'\™ '8®' Both tho amendments voted on at the last election were carried by large majorilies, f i the amendment relat­ ing to the coutiiy commissioners it provides for the election at the gen­ eral election in 1:1)2 of ,mi commis­ sioner for a ior n of I wo years and two for a term of lour years their term to begin ,u ianuars 1903. In j that way the heart Is of couuty com­ missioners iu no ease inn\ he cum posed of entirely new nieu, bur there will be on each board at. least, ouo who has had previous service. lit the amendment relating to the supreme court, hereafter die supreme court will have power to call district judges to the bench when a justice is disqualified in the consideration iof an appeal. -MANUFACTURER OF- A N D >Saw Mill South Fork Teton. Dimension Stuff to Order a Specialty. Dressed Lutnbe aud flooring. _ Tho nroduct of our Mill is offered at Reasonable Prices, Patronize a Teton County Enterprise and let us quote you Prices.' • HOLTER LOMBER COMPANY, INCORPORATED. The stale board of canvassers, consisting of the state auditor, state treasurer and attorney geueral, will meet in the secretary of slate’s office December 5th' to canvass tho returns. The board wiircoaufthe returns only as they relate to the state ticket Tho only man iu doubt on the demo­ cratic ticket is VYm. Y. Pembertou, who is thought to bo defeated. It has been definitely' settled that Mr. McKiuloy will in his annual message to congress, recommend that the regular army be increased to 100,000 meu, and that ho will indorse the recommendation of Secretary Long that three battleships aud twelve cruisers be built, and twenty thousand men aud boys bo enlisted in the navy. Thanksgiving day was not observ­ ed generally iu Choteau. No com­ munity on the' footstool bad more cause to bo thankful and it was the duty of overy rcsidout of our city to abstain from ordinary advocations aud attend divine service to givo thanks for the many blessings of the past year. G r e a t H’a.lls JVIorrt Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Building Paper, Builders’ Hardware, Mouldings, Sash, Doors, Etc., Etc. Write for Special Prices on Carloads F. O. B. your nearest Railroad Stariou. GEO. R. WOOD, Manager. Telephone 70. 200 Fifth Ave. S S. E. A t k in s o n , Pres. F. r. A tktnson . Cash.' J. S w itze r , Vico Pres. W. W. M ilder , Asst. Cash OF GREAT FAILS, MONTANA. Some enterprising townsman can invest his money to good advantage by building dwelling houses io reut. Choteau is badly in need of ' more tenement buildings. * Tom Sharkoy won out with Jim Corbett in Now York Tuesday. Al­ though Sharkey war, awarded the fight on a foul, he had Jim whipped. Tho Oldest Bank in tho City aud County. Incorporated. 1889. C a p i t a l , ................... $75,000 Surplus and Profits, $25,000 Correspondence Invited from those desiring to open Accounts in this City, or Contemplating Changes in Existing Arrangements. G. A. BOUTILLIER, Carpenter a, r i d Contractor * * t « Choteau, Montana, •' .• -AND- H 11 This is tho Largest and Best Regulated Stable in Choteau. Tournoutsto suit the wan ts of everybody* Prices are Reasonable and Services Satisfactory.’ SOLAR H, B R O ff & SON, PROPRIETORS : 1 havo opened a Bakery again and will * * ; i keep on hand fresh Bread, Pies qnd< Cakos. Orders promptly fiilbd. CONFECTIONERY, Fruit,Nuts and Canned Goods When in need of anything in my line remember the place and. g ivo. me your orders.^“ ^ —MRS. FAIRBAIRN. HOTEL MORTON, Dupuyer, Montana.. BOARD BY DAY :OR WEEK. R. M. STEELE, Proprietor. . ? * . Firstclass Accommodations, for : the- Traveling Public.-.. Courteous, Tr.eaj.ment.; Moderate¡Rates.-

Teton Chronicle (Choteau, Mont.), 25 Nov. 1898, located at <http://montananewspapers.org/lccn/sn85053028/1898-11-25/ed-1/seq-2/>, image provided by MONTANA NEWSPAPERS, Montana Historical Society, Helena, Montana.