The Saco Independent (Saco, Mont.) 19??-1971, May 24, 1912, Image 4

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:sY' uouse- Roosevelt Aiisolutely Defeated ; For a Third Term. SAY STATE TELLS TALE. Former President Needs 311 Delegates ' to Win, and Only 310 Remain tq Be. Elected—Taffies Tell the Story—The ' States In Which Delegates Are Yet tq Bo Chosen. « Theodore Roosevelt has already lost all chance of renomiiiation for a third term by Die ‘Republican natioual con­ vention at Chicago in June. Or: Satur­ day night, May 4, he needed 311 dele­ gates to control the convention and on, that, day only. 330 delegates remained to be chosen. The 74 i delegates al­ ready elected are instructed for or I »lodged to President Taft, Colonel Roosevelt and Senators l.a Collette mid Cummins, and of (his number President Taft lias almost two-tliirds for his renoiulnution. The plain defeat o f Colonel Roosevelt in Massachusetts practically took him out of the race, and the action of the ■Thirteenth Missouri district in sending to Chicago delegates pledged to Taft proved his'frtnlucky undoing. In Mas­ sachusetts tliè-contest was fought un­ der a presidential preference primary law which had Mr. Roosevelt’s com­ plete approval. The issues raised were Issues squarely between President Taft nntl Colonel'Roosevelt themselves, and the vote, showed this result: President Taft carried the presiden­ tial preference primary by 4.000 plural­ ity and liatT an actual majority over Loth Colonel Roosevelt and Senator La Follette. • The^ president carried nine of the fourteen congressional districts in the -‘»tâte. ^ tfhe Taft alternate ticket was elected by n plurality,-,.a«. large as the presi­ dent’s on the preference yote. ; The Taft-'delegate ticket was defeat- od through a technical, error on ilia *part of ii:e'TotersV’vi'bo were,'confused •by the presence o f an independent'Taft candidate on the ticket. This fact caused more than 18.000 voters to vote .for-»lue instead of eight Taft dele­ gates at large, thereby invalidating their ballots^ although their. preference »vas plainly shown. In recognition of this fact' Colonel Roosevelt himself ljgjs waived his claim ;to these dele­ gates. ? Taft's Widsiprssd Support. The overwhelming victory, of the president lias been hailed l>y Republic­ ans everywhere'»!.»,tbe-eud o f the light. Tind his renomination is now conceded * Taft. velt. A l.ibnm a ...■ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A l islca .................... ............ ; ............... 2 , C o lora d o ................. C o n n e c t icu t .......... .............................. 11 D e la w a r e ................ ...................... .. . G ^ D istrict o f Coluti ’.!•)' « .................... 2 * • G e o r g ia .................... •i ........................... 2S * • H a w a i i ....................... .............................. tí Illinois ....................... O f.8 In d ia n a ..................... OA • » * •*, •*» .♦ •»,,« all 10 Io w a ........................... .............................. 18 K a n s a s ......... -, ......... .............................. 2 i K e n t u c k y ................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 * o L o u isian a ................. ........................ . . . 20 « M a ine ......................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 M a s s a c h u s e t t s ... 10 M ich igan . ................. S * . M issouri .................. . ...T ................. ‘.i> 34 K e h r a s k a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 N e w H a m psh ire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 N 't - . c M e x ico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................. 7 1 N e w Y o r k ............... .............................. V i 7 N o r t h C u ;o!iu a .. .............................. 1 1 N o r t h D a k o t a .. ,,.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. O k lah o m a .. .... ..................... 4 ' 11 O r e g o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... 10 i hr t -.sylvan a _ _ _ _ _ _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . il \ .u Philippines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • » l ’o r l o R i c o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • > • • R h o d e Island _ _ _ _ _ _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . la • • i auth Garohn.a .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . It • • T e n n e s s e e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • * V e r m o n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ) V irgin ia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . W L c o n s iu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •- • • T o t a ls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L1!’1 N o t e . —S e n a t o r La F o llette has Ji) votes In N o r t h D a k o t a arai Lj in W isconsin: total. S e n a t o r C u m m in s has I> votes in Io*.v'a. Tilt* si a tea .v o t •r * u mt LA'-h-.tUn- A r k a n xas an t i N e v a d a , a r e :ts follows: A l . i ö a a n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •,.«. • « . « c rizo a a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . ! C a lifornia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , O • id a h o ............................ . .......................... .. . h K a n s a s ........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . li M a r y la n d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1(. Michl.sfsn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' 4 M a in e s o : a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 M issouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M o n t a n a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . s N e w Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1s N o r th C a r o l'n a . . . . O h io . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .K O k la h o m a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ _ _ _ _ _ ! ■ Sonili D a h o t i . . . . . w T e n n e s s e e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I t T e x a s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 'U tah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *■ W a s h in g t o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • h V /cst V irgin ia .... ................................. ij T o t a l ..................... ........ 310 Th.us.it is iippnrcMit that PresMont TaiTs rhnomuuiLkm is asKUivd ind that further qiiposiilon to him is-hopa- less. „ From now on the contest in the Reimblienn party is a mere band n « s- on procedure. £ WOMEN COMMEND TAFT. Praiz* Appointment of Woman to Head Child Bureau. President Taft’s appointment of Miss Julia I.athrop of Chicago to head tlie v.',' V: in;,* ci.Vi.ir a. day penclnn bill was pending in the pension committee, for al­ most four years, would not allow the bill, to be reported to the house. He favored; however, libera 1 .pensions l'or tho Spanish war soldiers. Your devoted brother, ISAAC U. SHERWOOD. HEW YORK STICKS TO TAFT. William Barnes, Jr., Says Eighty-three Delegates, Favor Presiden.t. William Ramos, Jr., chairman of the Republican slate committee, is keeping closely in touch avith the ninety dele- gales elected to ropiysent the organiza­ tion of Now .York at the Chicago con­ vention. , lie. has-received replies from many of the delegates to a letter re­ cently sent to them asking that they frankly state their position and views on the situation. Chairman Da rues says: \N'o matter what happens» bclweei- now and the titue of t he convention, the New York delegates will he for (he iv - itoiuinaUon of President Taft, with the except ion. of course, of those who were elected willi the understanding that they were for Roosevelt.\ 1 DR. WILEY 'FAVORS TAFt. oougni, hoci : and delivered on call.. They have instructed themsolv.es to vote for Taft by their own free will and volition, and vote for Taft iliey will in .the national convention. Among the Republicans of the south 'who have roundly denounced the methods of Rlxon and Mellarg are I'ope M. Long •and ,Sqiiator, Sloan of Alabama, Lee Brock of Tennessee. Colonel Henry S. Chubb of Florida. Henry S. Jackson o f Georgia and T. I,. Grant of Sontb Car­ olina. Him new child’s bureau in the department of commerce and labor has met with nothing but - universal. corJinendaUim ever since the announcement of the- appointment was made. Miss I.athrop ha3 long been associated Avith Miss ’Jane Adda ms of Chicago In settlement work and. has a most enviable con­ structive record along the lines upon which the new child bureau will be. administered. One of the most interesting features tv mi rtruuiuiu*i.iim uvn i - ’ , , ..v , . . 7 . . The president Will verify the claims lb« commendations which the presi- o f his Campaign managers made early received upon choosing a wo- in the contest in-that'he will have a majority of the delegates at Chicago from the north, south,-east and west. The president' has already carried the rockrlbbed Rermhlican .stales - o f New Hampshire. Vermont. Massachusetts. Connecticut, Rhode Island', Ne\v York, IJelaware, .Indiana, Michigan. Ken-, tacky. Iowa, Colorado .and Nevada*. The Republican state» yet to be heard from include New Jersey, Ohio, Min­ nesota and most of the mountain* anil Pacific stateR.^all .of .which ai*e lepn- _ Ing to the president’s support. f The figures to date; showing thevut-' ter hopelessness of Mr. Roosevelt’s campaign for renomination and the ab- »olnte certainty of the reuomination o f President Taft, i* contained in the ¡following tables: ’ If umber of delegates to the national convention . ..............................................1.0”* I4^cea*ary to nominate........................... WO Delegates elected .................. 744 Delegates to be elected ........................... 5184 Of the delegates elected— M r. Taft has. ............. ' W Mr. Roosevelt lias..•■«...*».••........... 22S Atr. Xifl. Follette h a s . . . . . . . 3 * > Mr. Cummins has .................................... .JO Total ...... . ... *Hj Of the delegates to be elected— . Mr. Taft n e e d s . ............ • ................ 71 Mr. Roosevelt needs ...... . ....................... 311 Mr. I.a Follette needs ............... '504 Mr. Cummins n e e d ..................... 580 The states of Arkansas, 18 votes, and Nevada, 6 vojea, are now ready to ( :ict finally, both being for President i resentatives, ro^ii—the first woman,to hold n bn- lreati headship under the 'government— for this! Important.work has been tlie- voluntary expressions from women of the highest rank lu the nation' for.hu­ man .conservation. Among those wlm have expressed themselves in the high­ est praise of the act o f President Taft are -Rev. Anna H. Shaw of-New York. Mrs. Philip ! N. Moore ,qit St. Louis, president o f the General Federation of Women's Clubs; Mrs. John-Miller-Hoy-\ ton of New York.-,vice president1 gen­ eral of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Mrs. Margaret Dye Iillis, secretary of 'the National Women's Christian Temperance ‘ Union; Miss Mabel T. Ttoardnian, secretary of the Aiuerlcau Red Cross; Mrs. John Hays Hammond,'chairman of the women’s welfare department of the NatJoiia.1 Civic Federation.-and Mlss C. E. Ma­ son o f Tarrytown, X. Y. PENSION RECORDS SHOWN. Da-- Cangrassman Praiaa Taft’a and - naunca Raoaavalt’a Act». ': [President-Taft’s'\attitude toward pen;* slons for tlm veterans of the civil,; war has'Jjeen perslsteutly' misrepresented throughout this entire campaign by his ! opponents.’ Recently Representative ¡Cyrus Sulloway of ’ New Tiaitapsldre. j for many years cliHlruiHii of the coni- imittee on pensions o f the house of rep- wen t on reroFtL. publicly Taft. This means 24 additional votes for Taft and makes the real Taft fig­ ures as follows:? For Tfltt . ......... . IPS Mr. Taft needs ................ *.>...,. ...... 47 Adding'ArkHnsas and-Nerada to- the Taft-total-would increase the .total of , delegates elected to 768 a n d -reduce j testimony in favor of President Taft the number to be. elected to,310^ Tt a t ; !«!!«* against Colonel Roosevelt'on: the •ft*»*« fiiB Uonaoviiir f'flWo o« follow«- '- tienMloii'record. /J’he fact-that Getier, in favor of,President Taft and against’ I Mr. Roosevelt, basing Ills Judgment | solely on the pension record of ..the two. !,candidates. Now Representative,Isaac pR.' Sherwood of Ohio, .author of the, j “ dollar a day’’ pension bill, wltli which, ¡every ohl soldier is familiar, 'adds his Tells How, Rqq?«y«!.t. Undid Through; Romsan Board.,. 1 Àn iutorview -in ./the /Boston'“Herald April 23 wish JiiTWrley is hs follows: “ Vi's. 1 said' it.\ ! Wliy- shoiíídn’t I have said itV Would 1 not. hé an i;i- gralc from my head to my toes if I did not say icV . = Thus did Dr. Wiley. pure food cham­ pion. until recently chief chemist of* the department of agriculture, reiter­ ate ids hope that President Taft would lie re-e’e led. líe reiterated wh'en shown a copy of a statement which he had ‘been represented as making in Cincinnati a few days ago. That stath­ aïe:: I ran as follows: '‘President Taft is the one man who stood between me-'and destruction at Washington. \AYhc'it efforis were being wade to asKsissiiVaic me Taft proven! my only protector. lie stood by me, «nd I am grateful iujiirn. I hope he will be re elected.\ “ Will you te’l about the origin of the Remsen b o a r d w a s asked. “ Why, I guess*s6.’’ came the answer promptly, “ i woré a muzzle becoming­ ly for a long time. Perhaps the truth ought to be told about that board right now. “Jt was appointed by Sir; Roosevelt as president o f the United States either on the suggestion fo him of the secre­ tary of agriculturevor by Ids own sug­ gestion to tiie secretary. The actual announcement was made by the, secre­ tary of agriculture. -1- was ,told that Mr. Roosevelt selected Dr. Remsen a'nd.' P l Remsenr.seiected his assocl? aies/’ ,• “ What about, di^Ypi^i^tiqns ;Toï the .support of the bb'a'm-and the aiítíiórity of .law for itçîappQbirineùtî’* was asked. “ ‘The appointnn/nt was by the exec­ utive order of President, Roosevelt,\ replied! Dr. Wiley1. \ “ Every dollar paid to Ihe Reuisen board for-all of its work .lias been paid from appropriations made tq .the bureau of chemistry for the purpose of eiiforcing the food and drugs act „ ’ ••” ’ “The Renisen board was appointed in.IbOS,’’ continue^;Dr.'Wiley. “In a little less-than ayear^on Jan. 23, 3009 (well toward », tfie^nfl. of President Ropse volt's the Rem-, sen bôàrd rendered its verdict favor­ able to the use of benzoate of soda iu food products. The ppinion was pub­ licly promulgated some two or three •niputlis later. Tlie tëenisen board lias been Investigating sulphur dioxide all .the years.slhc&'tli^lV alid has not made its report yeti’ , • * . T V- LINCOLN’S SON EXPOSES T. R. . . . - “Do You Want Gettysburg Speech Re­ written?'1! Hs Asks! .' Tlie following is an excerpt from a statement issued by Robert T. Lincoln, son of President Lincoln, in which he protests against tlie distortion of his father's speeches by .Theodore Roose­ velt: “ My personal feelings are tmimpoi; taut, but t mu not only impatient, but iudigna&k, that President Lincoln’s words and plain views should, be per­ verted and misapplied before trusting people into support of doctrines which I believe he would abhor, living. * * * “These often quoted words of presi­ dent Lincoln are now deliberately al tered. and argument founded on their altered form. * '. “ If I may be permitted-to say it. I do •not think tlie public wishes the Gettys­ burg speech to be rewritten and its words changed by any oue, however distinguished, for any purpose, least o* all in order to support a proposition that President Lincoln would not pos sibly have hail in mind.” v - THE ROOSEVELT CAMPAIGN. fects tlie Roosevblt table as' follows:' ‘dumber of.delegates yePto be elected 310 r*f*}ioos6Yclt noodiif»»•••«•»»••••«<,»••»* 311 Hence Sir. Roosevelt has already lost control of the convention. ' • : Deiagatss EΫot«d. ' , '’delegates already; elected! to-tiie' ChTSf^o convention are either-instruct-, i*fï for or pledged to the various candi­ dates as follow^: - n iVenalon record. .Tin? fact-that General Slierwocd is a -Democrat only adds to the effectiveness of. lji»; statement, ijis liis Voie- interest between Republican 'candidafes is to see to it $ ha t’\l he’ in­ terest* o f the old soldiers «re fully, and amply protected. In a. recent letter to hist brother he tv rote: , ■What. J said about Preaia^ntTTaft was' that I bellaväd lis would fljifii a moderate-, psnsloh bill thaf'would cost A lion t j l 5,000,- OOp. “B'Jt'President P.-^a-vcit fa r - > ii *».» Appsal Now Takon From Pooplo to tho Bos«»«. Stej> by step Theodore Roosevelt's campaign for a .renomhiatlon for a third term is falling by tlie wayside. At first Mr. liooseyelt made a direct bid for instructed*delegates for him­ self. This effort niet with such a fee­ ble response at the hands of tlid Ite- pubHeaiis' throughout the country that Senator .Dlxoif aiitViljs 'other, managers undeyt‘(Sok; to'Jet^iip! tiirotVirlioiit the .south,.as ..an'Evidence, tii'at ' Mr. ..Rooa.eveR^ -/campaigu, -Avas. making .eveiL-gmitec-:progress .than It really was. Now. haring been de­ feated In their prt^po«e of securing; a majority or the ' national Republican convention and havingJiad their •■“ con­ tests\ hr the south, “ shown up\ in their true light...(lie , Roosevelt managers have turned tlielriattentioa to persuad­ ing delegates actually instructed or pledged to President,Taft toVbott tlielr hist ructions. In Other words, instead of living .-up to their’ professed ’intern Hon; o f ■ appealing t(>_tlie people Mr. Roosevjfjt and. hi^'Tn a lingers are now appeiilliig . dRe<41y ,.to - tiie,' i>olltlcal \bosses'’ to licip.'thenf outjbf a <ho!e. , ‘ -.•The'work done by .Ormsby Mellarg .with respect;:id ;p6B\iadIi)g sotitheni delegates to7 bolt ^i^aldeht.;Taft, has met wllliv a warm1, reception in thq south. The southern / leaders' of the Republican., patty; are/, thoroughly in-., suited and inceiisi^^t the .attitude as-- aumed by. Mr!i;;Roeisfe^lt’s^pi^en & ^ •tiveis toward iheiii'adS^Ylielti Siiioelii ‘(¿¡Hi and they deelai^'tlfat’soutber» Repub­ licans are. not; mere .chattel* Veten- ■ V Ths Montana stallion regis- tratlpn law in preventing un-, sound scrub stallions cbming to the state is most effective and is attracting national at­ tention. The following is a copy of a .letter from one of the largest breeders and im­ porters in the United States. “ I am fully in accord with your law. There should have been similar U._ S. Govern­ ment law thirty-five years ago, a;nd if enforced, the benefit.by now would be almost beyond estimate.” * ^ ’ Arrtong other letters received is one frormthe State narian of Iowa. t:Des Moinej3,’Ia. \ April 15. R. W :Clark, Sec., Stallion Registration Board, Bozeman, Mont» Dear Sir: I am very favorably impress­ ed with your law especially Sec. 6, this one section Tthink is worth more „to your state than our entire., stallion law is to the state o f Iowa.-^T^isd: claim should,.be„ finsfc,f:^nd important’ eiàse in :;every. stsiil^ ion-law. The last clause-of this section is a very import­ ant one which excludes scrub stallions entirely. I also pre­ fer, yoür law in regatd to the registration fee. Our Board ot Agriculture charges $1.00 for recording stallions and is­ suing licenses and allows the veterinarian to charge his own fees,which is not nearly so satisfactory..or' unifprm.'as ,it will be under your law. > I request that you. send me\ 100 of the Veterinary Certifi­ cates blanks and 100 copies of the law for distribution in this state. - . . . t . 4 Yours very truly, J. k plbso.n. State Veterinarian.-’ •/ -Sectiori^six of- .the law ..pro- liibits.the * importation of \un­ sound'dr scub stallions. The railroads .. .are beginning ? to comply with the law. and horses are -bei ng .held in. transit at the expense ôif the shippër-. I ~ — : -------------------------------- j Bozeman, May 19.— Twen- jty-six students will receive tliieir degrees at the Moiitafià State College the first week ini June. O f this number twen- tv-two receive bachelor’s de­ grees, cne receives a\\Tlegrefe from the . pharmacy depart­ ment, and three receive mas­ ter’s degrees for post-graduate work. The bachelors o f seienee * * V according to classification by courses are quite evenly .div­ ided. Five >vilfreceive degrees from th*1 History Literature department, five will receive degrees from the Agronomy department, ’ three from Civil engineering, three from Home Science, two in Electrical en­ gineering, and one in Biology. Tlie graduates are Margaret Edwards and Edna Hager- man of Great Falls, Freeman .Daley, John Hodgskiss and Glenn Luther o f Chouteau, Noble Donaldson of Helena, Wiliiain Shovell of Hamilton, Gebrge Cook of Como, Charles Draper of Red Lodge, John Blessing of Brownsville, Minn- Kyle Jones of Dupuyei’, Guy Millegan of M ille­ gali, John Taylor of Chinook, Harold W olpert of Boulder, John McCraw of Springfield, Mo., and Laura Piedalue, Florence Baker, Inez Dusen- beriy, Ruthf Hinman. George Morgan, and Joe Morgav. o f “ Bozeman. Henry Burfiend . o f Dillon graduates from the pharmacy department, and June Phil- pott of Boseman receives the (degree o f M. . S ., Orville S. Peters, E. E ., and Lucille Higgins the degree o f M. S. Bczeman, May 19.—The victory o f the State College over the University at Miss­ oula by the scorè o f G8 to' 58- practically closes the contest season at the college and it serves as a climax to a season in which -the college - lias won the state championship in bas­ ketball, debating, oratory and .The track victory at Miss- oula; has created, great enthus­ iasm among the members o f the student body. It was the first victory of this sort which the State College won from the University and when the news reached Bozeman the students fired the college can­ non, built a big fire, and wound up the evening’s cele­ bration with an informal dance iu the gyniha^iunci. / ''OfYthe fourteen events in the'.meet^. M . S. C. won nine firsts to the . UniversityV^fivr. Captain Blinri’ led in the individual work by Scoring one first, two seconds, and one third .hut the scoring on the part, o f the col­ lege men was on .the whole'' evenly divided and not due to the work of one or two men. The team consisted o f Captain George Blinn and Max Kenck hi* Butte, Tom Hillis, Noble ' *.'. ,, v r , * : * . Doiialdson tind Rowland U a c- gele of HeleKu, John E i ' Hddgkiss o f Chou teatr, A Y ill- iaxni Vestal and Ralph Bra-, ’ (Continued, on page 5) \

The Saco Independent (Saco, Mont.), 24 May 1912, located at <http://montananewspapers.org/lccn/sn86075253/1912-05-24/ed-1/seq-4/>, image provided by MONTANA NEWSPAPERS, Montana Historical Society, Helena, Montana.