The Great Falls Leader (Great Falls, Mont.) 1888-1900, March 25, 1890, Image 18

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16 G R E A T F A L L S A N D E N V I R O N S . others undergoing developments. In addition to these metals, enor­ mous iron veins are found skirting the mountains, like huge belts lying across the hills. Nearly all the streams here have easy grades, wagon roads following all the gulches. This renders the mines easy of access for railroads, and it is now a certainty that it will only be a brief period before all the camps will have cheap and rapid trans­ portation. Many miners have been waiting ten long years, working claims known to be rich, hoping some time to be able to realize a competency to repay them for their long years of labor. It is to be hoped that their expectations will be realized in as brief a period as possible. With the incoming o f 1890 , not only all these mining regions referred to are going to experience a great change, but also the whole of this section of Northern Montana. Besides the increased output of the precious and useful metals, the various areas of coal will be developed, and the unlimited amount of the finest building material in the state close at hand will be utilized, not only for the benefit of this section, but for the whole of Montana at large where required. jv io h t n r m jv n ^ E s ii e a i d t h b Below will be found a few interesting comparisons, showing the figures paid by dividend-paying mines in the gold, silver and lead- producing sections of the United States up to and including eleven months of the year 1889. It will be seen that, as usual, Montana is far in the lead of any other state or territory producing the precious metals. The following are the figures: Montana...................................................................................................$3,353,250 Michigan .......................................................................................................... 2,390,000 U tah................................................................................................................... 1,292,500 (’d o r a d o ............................................................................. 922,500 N evada.............................................................................................................. 867,960 California.......................................................................................................... 568,903 Dakota............................................................................................................... 280,000 Idaho .................................................................................................................. 105,000 Arizona.............................................................................................................. 70,000 New Mexico...................................................................................................... 45,000 Alaska................................................................................................................ 25,000 Missouri............................................................................................................ 24,400 One Montana mine, the Granite Mountain, is credited with $2,200,000, being the largest sum paid by any m ining com p a n y in the U n ited States. The nearest approach to the figures rolled up by the Granite M ountain w a s paid b y the Calum et and H e cla, of M ichigan, a copper-producing property which has to its credit the sum of $1,500,000. These figures speak volum es for M ontana as a m ining country. JVTontana the Jiotne iop Working ^Vlen. W O R K E R S A N D T H E I R W AGES. Prices paid for skilled artisans and labor: Bricklayers, per day ............................................................................. $ 5.50@$ 6.00 Stonemasons, per day ........................................ , ............................... 5.00(a) 7.00 Plasterers, per day............................................................................... 4.00(a) 6.00 Joiners, per day .................................................................................... 4.00 Carpenters, per day ....................... f . . ................................................ 4.50@ 5.00 Miners, per day..................................................................................... 3.50@ 4.00 Painters, per day .................................................................................. 3.50(a) 4.00 Plumbers, per d a y ............................................................................... 4.50(a) 5.00 Steam fitters, per day.......................................................................... 5.00 (xas fitters, per day ..................................................................... 4.00 Tinners, per day............................................................................... . 4.00 Erick molders, per day ................................................................ 4.00 Blacksmiths, per day .................. 3.00(a) 3.50 Harness makers, per d a y .................................................................. 3.50 Saddlers, per d a y ................................................................................. 4.00 Teamsters, per month ........................................................................ 75.00 Quarrymen, per d a y ............................................................................ 3.50 Male cooks, per m o n th ......................................................................... 50.00@ 100.00 Brewers, per month ............................................................................. 65.00 Hands in breweries, per m o n th ....................................................... 40.00 Cellar men, per month, with board ................................................. 75.00 Maltsters, per month, with board ................................................... 65.00 Wash house, per month, with board ........................ 40.00 Professional brewers, first-class, of executive ability, per year.2,000.00@3,000.00 Delivery wagons, per m o n th................................................................ 60.00(a) 75.00 Prescription clerks, per month ......................................................... 100.00 Printers, on morning papers, per thousand .................................. 50 Printers, on evening papers, per thousand .................................... 45 Wages in printing office, per w eek ................................................. 21.00 Butchers, per m o n th ..................................................................... 50.00 Meat cutters, per month, and board ............................................... 70.00 Hostlers, per m o n th............................................................................ 70.00 Stock tenders, per month .................................................................. 70.00 Hod carriers and mortar mixers, per day ...................................... 3.00 Diggers and shovelers, per day......................................................... 2.50 Laborers in brick yards, per month, and board ........................... 50.00 Temperers, per month, and board ................................................... 50.00

The Great Falls Leader (Great Falls, Mont.), 25 March 1890, located at <http://montananewspapers.org/lccn/sn86075267/1890-03-25/ed-1/seq-18/>, image provided by MONTANA NEWSPAPERS, Montana Historical Society, Helena, Montana.