The Great Falls Leader (Great Falls, Mont.) 1888-1900, March 25, 1890, Image 20

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18 GREAT FALLS AND ENVIRONS. Hack drivers, per month........................................................................... ,■ $70.00 Stage drivers, per month, and board.............................................. 50.00 Car drivers, per month ....................................................................... 75.00 Upholsterers, per m onth.....................................................................$ 100.00@ 125.00 Bookkeepers, per m o n th.................................................................... 75.00@ 150.00 Draftsmen, per month........................................................................ 85.00(g) 125.00 Dry goods clerks, per month. ......................................................... 65.00(a) 125.00 Grocers’ salesmen, per month ........................................................... 100.00 Clothing salesmen, per month........................................................... 75.00(a) 100.00 Hank clerks, per month ...................................................................... 100.00(a) 125.00 Jewelers, first-class, per week........................................................... 25.00 Tailors, making coats.......................................................................... 9.50(a) 18.00 Tailors, making pants ......................................................................... 3.50(a) 4.25 Tailors, making v ests.......................................................................... 3.00 Shoemakers, for pair of boots ........................................................... 6.00 Shoemakers, repairing, per cent ...................................................... 50 Photographers, per week ................................................................... 15.00(a) 30.00 Clerks, per m o n th................................................................................ 75.00(a) 100.00 Typewriters, per month ..................................................................... 75.00 Stenographers and typewriters ........................................................ 100.00 School teachers and principals, per month ................................... 75.00(a) 150.00 School teachers, female, per month ............................................... 50.00(a) 75.00 The laws of Montana are especially in the interests of wage workers. They give them preference and make their wages a lien for all sums earned sixty days prior to any assignments to the extent of $200. The same preference is given to claims for wages against the estates of deceased persons, coming in first after the expenses of the funeral, the last sickness, and of administration and legal allow­ ance to the widow and infant children. Also in case of executions, attachments and writs of a similar nature, issued against any person, corporation, association, copartnership or chartered company, upon the claimant making affidavit to his or her claim and filing the same with the sheriff or other executive officer charged with the execution of such writ. STOC^ SHlP]VIH]SlTS FOf* 1889 . There were shipped from the several stations on the Montana Central and Manitoba railways during the shipping season of 1889, from northern Montana to the eastern markets over 30,000 head of cattle. The amount of money which the cattle growers of Montana realized for these cattle in the eastern market foots up to nearly $1,000,000, and still there are people who say that the cattle indus­ try does not pay. If there is any other business in which a man can engage that will bring larger returns for a small outlay we would like to know what it is, and so would the cattle growers. SA?Jt> COUliEE. The town of Sand Coulee is situated about ten miles south of Great Falls, but the close business relations between the two places virtually make them one city. The town contains seventy-five dwelling houses, three boarding houses, hotel, several general mer­ chandise stores, school house, etc. The population at present is about 1,000. There is no other town of its size in Montana that has the life and business rustle of Sand Coulee. The town has all the railroad facilities that larger cities enjoy, a train to and from Great Falls almost every hour of the day. Constant increase of dwellings is made necessary by the inflow of population. The greater portion of the inhabitants of the town are in some way or other connected in the working of the great coal mines of that vicinity. The principal mines of the Sand Coulee Coal Company lie in close proximity to the town, and are a scene of busy life. Under the direction of Manager Burrell the business at the mines moves along like clock work. At present the output is 1,000 tons of lump and 300 tons of nut coal per day. From sixty-five to seventy cars of coal leave the mines every clay for the trade. The Great North­ ern road takes 600 tons daily, and the remainder is shipped to Butte, Anaconda, Helena, Marysville and other points along the several railroads. A new clump-house of double capacity has just been fin­ ished, and other important improvements in and about the mines are being pushed ahead. At present 400 men are employed. Within a short time 500 more men will be put to work, which will increase the output of coal to about 2,000 tons per day. The new improvements about the mines will foot up something over $20,000 in the past six months. The monthly pay roll now averages $70,000. The coal from the mines is equal to the best coal produced from the mines of the eastern coal regions. Prof. G. C. Swallow, M. E., State Mining Inspector of Montana, and a geologist of great reputa­ tion, has made a thorough examination and analysis of the coal taken from these mines, and we are permitted to copy from advance proof

The Great Falls Leader (Great Falls, Mont.), 25 March 1890, located at <http://montananewspapers.org/lccn/sn86075267/1890-03-25/ed-1/seq-20/>, image provided by MONTANA NEWSPAPERS, Montana Historical Society, Helena, Montana.