The Flathead Courier (Polson, Mont.) 1910-current, August 11, 1911, Image 3

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r u n u u n u u m t YOU WORK HARD | FOR YOUR MONEY! Make Your Money J W r u | Put It In O u r Bank When you work hard for your money, don’t fool It away. Make it work hard for you. It will if you will take care of it, and put it in the bank. They’ll m a k e it work £ for you- th a t’s their business “YOUR HOME BANK” The of Poison y m CANT BUY A'TOiNU * W ITH THE MONEY 4? _ y o u h a v e S p e n t <rp^ n'ro-zs- Bank ONE DOLLAR A DAY - $ 6 a week—for only one year, and leave it stay for 3 0 years. At 3 per cent, compound interest, this will amount to $ 7 5 8 . 1 6 ; at 4 per cent, compound interest, this will amount to $ l , 0 1 0 . 8 8 --a snug sum for old age. Make OUR bank YOUR bank Flathead County Slate Bank Of POLSON, MONTANA. Capital $25,000 Aug. PETERSON, A D. MAYNARD, M. A. MYHRE President Vice President Cashier J O H . G R O N A A S G e n t s . T a i l o r i n g English Scotch or Am erican Goods to s e lect from. Cleaning and Pressing French Dry Cleaning. A Speciality LADIES CLOTHES Cleaned and P ressed McMichael B’ld’g., 3rd Ave. BAe Thirteenth Floor A Case Where the Number Thirteen Make-. Good Its Reputation B y C L A R IS S A M A C K IE ' Copyright by American Press Asso­ ciation, 1911. As tbe otlice door closed behind the retreating form of Hom er Dickson the stout stenographer sighed relievedly and drew a magazine from her desk. “I thought he'd never go,\ she said. The dapper bookkeeper took a silver quarter from his pocket nud flipped lt tow ard the office boy. “ P eanuts,\ be snid succinctly as lie spread the m o rn­ ing paper over his ledger and turned to the m a rket report. “ 1 saw Homer boatin’ it for tho fer­ ry,\ rem a rked Jim m y when he return­ ed with the peanuts and thoy had bepn divided info three portions. “I guess he’s good for tlie day.” “So he said,” agreed the bookkeeper, cracking shells and tossing them over his shoulder into tbe w aste paper bas­ ket with adm irable dexterity, \if you w ant the afternoon off. Miss Porter, you can have it,\ he said, with a smile. The stenographer smiled lazily aa tthe reached for another peanut. “Tbis suits me,” she m u rm u red, turning the pages of her magazine. Suddenly tho outer door opened and precipitated confusion upon the trio. A tall man, middle aged, with a strong, clean cut face and piercing dark eyes glanced from one to the other. “Mr. Dickson in?” he asked sharply. “Out,\ said the bookkeeper curtly, thrusting the new spaper into a draw cr and dipping pen into the Ink well. •“\When will he return?\ asked the stronger quietly. “H e didn't say. I think he’s gone for the day.\ replied the clerk ungrn ciously as be bont above his ledger. “I’ll w a it aw h ile,” rem arked the vis­ itor, seating him self in a chair and opening n notebook. Bray, the bookkeeper, shrugged his narrow shoulders and applied himself to his neglected work Miss Porter laid aside her magazine and thum ped noisily upon the typew riter, while. Jim m y sw e p t up the accum u lation of peanut shelis and filed letters with brisk attention. Tho s tranger s a t absorbed in his note­ book. m a k ing calculations with a stub by lead pencil. “Nice w e a ther for crops.” rem arked Bray, with a slight wink toward tlin stepograpber. Miss P o rter ruffled her flaxen poinpn dour and giggled. W e got our bay all in,\ said .Jimmy nasaliy, as he scuttled past tiie si ran ger on business inlent. “You re’cllect our old black hen?” w:ent on Bray facetiously. “ Waal, by gum, she laid a egg yesterday most as big as a grapefruit. I reckon on semi ing it to the county fail*.\ “Did Mr. Dickson mention having an appointm e n t with Mr Pen worth this m o rning?\ asked the rustic. A loaden silence settled ou lhe oflice Bray broke It a t la s t “P e n w o rth!’’ he gasped, w ith-a sick­ ly smile. “J. A u g u stus Pen worth?\ The stranger nodded im p a tiently and glanced a t his watch. “Did Mr Dick sou mention liavlng an engagement w ith me?” No, sir,” returned the bookkeeper respectfully. “I think he m u st be de lained somewhere. I’ll try to trace him by phone. Jim m y , give Mr. Pen w o rth n seat in Mr. Dickson’s oillce.\ Bray disappeared within the telephone booth wiih agitated countenance “Tell that idiot to keep away from the telephone. I'll w ait til) Mr. Dick son comes in,” growled the visitor so savagely th a t Jim m y skipped to obey The brutal message, conveyed verba tim , Mr. Bray emerged from the booth with a very red face and returned to his ledger, while Mr. Penwortb ac­ cepted a com fortable Turkish rocker ln the private office and lighted a long black cigar. “J. A u g ustus Penw o rlh, M ultimil­ lionaire nnd King of Finance.” Ro the special article in B ray's Sunday news­ paper had Capitalized him. Hls natiK w as as well known as (bat of the pres­ ident of the republic, and the entire office force had laughed openly at him. Bray w rithed on his high stool as he looked at tbe back of the millionaire's gray head, and he cursed his own bad m a n n ers in ridiculing the stranger. Bray was am bitious, and Pen worth w a s known to bo especially Interested in young men and If he knew them to be capable and willing to work could alw a y s find places for them in his nu­ merous industrial plauts. The book­ keeper hud read the article in the Sun­ day paper, and his im agination had been Bred with tho possibilities that would open out if he should ever cross the path of the great man. H e re he w aa—J. Augustus Pen worth, and Bray hnd ridiculed hlml It was too much to bear calmly, yet tlio book­ keeper solaced him self with the thought th a t perhaps tho millionaire hnd been too much absorbed in his notebook to heed the idle chattering of the office force. Bray's usual alert ledger to vault and spoke with an air of authority. Altogether he showed hlui*elf vo be a mnn of considerable affairs All the lim e he was plu;isaiit- ly aw;ire that the greal financier h::d wheeled his chair about and was winching wiih curious inlentiiess). After awhile when business hnd qui'-teii down the financier beckoned , the bookkeeper into the private otlice, ami ns the gratllied Bray paused be- j fore him Pen worth asked: I “ Uow long bave you been with Mr. Dickson V\ \Ten years,\ stam m ered Bray ex­ citedly. “And I suppose you are satisfied with your position?\ \W ell—not exactly, sir. You see, , there is no chance for advancem ent.” “Il'in—I can imagine not—here!” \How much is Dickson paying you now?” demanded J. Augustus P e n ­ worlh “Fifteen hundred, sir.” “I'll give you three thousand,” snap­ ped out Penworth. \1 like your looks, and you're ju s t the sort of chap I'd i like to have around—young, active and , businesslike. W hat do you say?\ Bray gasped. “ Why, yes. sir—thank , you. sir! I shall be delighted” - he stuttered. \Can you come to me tom o rrow?” asked Penworth. The bookkeeper hesitated a brief in­ stant. then: “Yes, sir, I will come to­ morrow. Of course Mr. Dickson could uot expect me to refuse such au ex­ cellent offer.” he said reflectively. \Of course not—even If you have been with him ten years,\ rejoined Penworth grimly, \Now Mr.— e r ” - “ B ray—H a rry Bray, sir.\ “Mr. Bray suppose yon sit right down and pen a letter of resignation to Mr. Dickson. 1 like to have these m a tters cleared up a s I go along, other wise I’m ap t to forget them. If you resign now I can put you right into our main office here to fill an im p o r­ tan t vacancy. There are w riting ma­ terials here on this small table.\ The bookkeeper sa t down and nerv­ ously inditPd a brief epistle to hls em­ ployer, in which he form ally resigned his position, stating his reasons for doing so and generously waiving ail salary due him in lieu of longer notice. This he closed iu au envelope which he scaled aud addressed. Mr. Penw o rth held out his hand for it and regarded the envelope with a thoughtful smile. \Now that's settled.” he said, “1 suppose you'll want to settle up your books, Mr Bray. I'm rather impressed with tbe rapidity with which that young woman out there operates her machine. Now. I’m in need of just such au expert stenographer, and while I suppose it doesn’t look exactly square to take Dickson’s help aw ay from him—it’s all in tlie business and I pay my people well. Send her to me, will you?\ Miss' P o rter was flattered and charm ed to accept a position iu tiie luxuri ously appointed offices of Penw o rth & Co. a t double her present salary. Soon­ er or later ability will meet with its proper reward, she told herself, while she was w riting her letter of instant resignation at Pen w o rth’s dictation. He held the two letters in his hand ond regarded them thoughtfully. Jim m y drooped forlornly when he heard the whispered confidences of tho other. He had uot read “From Office Boy to M illionaire\ for nothing, and here was his chance to rise J. Augus­ tus Penworth was pushing people along on the upw ard path. Why could not honest Jim m y Lee be am ong the risers? T h a t w as how it happened that he approached the great man and respect­ fully asked for a Job ns office boy, and he got It. Twice the salary he had been receiving caused his eyes to s p a r­ kle joyously. Mr. Penw o rth had ju s t told him th a t be could w rite a letter of resignation when there was tiie sound of rapid footsteps in the corri­ dor outside. Instantly the m illionaire leaped to his feet, and Bray and Miss Porter, who wore ln the line of vision, saw him drop their letters of resignation through the letter slot into Dickson’s Notice For Publication Re-Publication Department of t lu; Interior, I\. S. Land Ollice ai Ka.l.> pei:, m niana, I 27th, litll. Notice is hereby July loiii, 11)11. Nonce is hereby j given tliat Lais Thomas Larson, of gi ven Uiat Louis G. Triebel, of Bigarm 1’otson, Montana, who on May 24lli, Notice Por Publication Department of the Interior, LT. S. Land Ollice at Kalispell, Montana, Montana, wlio, on May ulli, 11)10, made Homestead entry No. 01807 for Lots 1 and 4, N. E. i N. E. ±, Section 20 and S. Jfi. 1-4 S. E. 1-4, Loi 3 Sec. 17, T. 23 N., it. 21 VV., Montanu Meridian, and thereat ter on April 3rd, 1911, made Homestead entry 03249 (additional) for N. E. 1-4 S. 13. 1-4, Section 17, Town- siiop 23 JS'., Range 21 W., Montana Meridian, lias tiled notice of intention to make I'irial Commutation Proof, lo estabiisli claim to tlie land above described, before llegister and Recei­ ver, U. S. Laud Office, at Kalispell, Montana, on tiie 28th day of August, 1911. Claimant names as witnesses: Jay L. Tabor, Como Trogden, Cliarles T ippett and Demetrius Rodomor, all of Big­ arm, Moutana. (Not Coal Land) Andrew W. Swaney, llegister. -14 NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION Department of the Interior, U. S. Land Ofllce sit, Kalispell, Montuna, July IlHh, 1‘Jll. Notice U hereby given that Eugene Desarnio, of Poison, Montana, wlio, ou May 28rd, 1010, made Home­ stead Entry, No. 0:2108, for \V. ^iN. 13. !-i (.Unit ■li”,) Section 27, Township 22 N., Range 21 \V„ Montana Meridian, hat, tiled notice of intentlou to make Final Commutation Proof, to establish claim to the land above described, before Regis­ ter ai;d Receiver, U. S. Land Oillce at Kalis­ pell, Montaua, on the 24th day of August, tail, Claimant names as witnesses: Charles w. Ulomburg, Lafayette Coleman, John w. Fuller und Thomas Kelley, all of I'olson, Montaua. (Not Coul Land) Andrew W. Swaney, 7-U Register closed nnd locked desk, and they ex­ changed glances of satisfaction. Tho outer door opened, nnd there w as the sound of footfalls. J. Augus­ tus Penw o rth thrust aside the startled Jim m y nnd darted behind the tall desk, where he crouched ns if In fear. “J. A u g u stus Penw o rth? Let’s have a look nt him,” said a gruff voice, nnd two dnrk form s filled the doorway of the private office beforo they discov­ ered the m illionaire nnd pounced upon him ju s t in tim e to w rest a revolver from his hand. “No. you don’t, Mr. Mike H ennes­ sey, alias The Farm er, w anted for forgery nnd so forth! We tracked you to this building, nnd we’ve raked ev­ ery office w ith n flue toothed comb till we come to the thirteenth floor. Say, Mike, this number thirteen ’s nn un­ lucky num b e r for you all right.” The detectives laughed as they hand­ cuffed tholr prisoner, and the other nsked. with n humorous wink: “J. Au­ gustus Penw o rth. are yon moving in high financial circles, eh? W hat kind of business you been transacting here?\ Tho prisoner stared Impudently at th e horrified faces of the bookkeeper and the stenographer and winked to­ w a rd the locked desk whore tlieir res­ ignations waited Homer Dickson’s re­ turn. “I been studying human nature some and plnylng schoolteacher by NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION Department of tlie Interior, U. S. Land Otlice al Kalispell, Montana, July 21, 1911. Notice is hereby given tliat Elzear Laundry, of Poison, Mon­ tana, who on May 11th, 1910; made Homestead Entry, No. 01948, for Si NVVi, N E i NW i and NW i NEi, Sec­ tion 24, Township 22, N, Range 21 W., Montana Meridian, lias tiled notice of intention to make I ’inal Commutation Proof, to establish claim to tiie iand above described, before Register and Receiver, U. S. Land Ollice at Kalis­ pell, Montana, on the 4tli day of Sep­ tember, 1911. Claimant names as witnesses: Thom­ as Kelley, John W. .Fuller, Eugene Desarmo and Edward Kelley, all of Poison, Montana. (Not Coal Land) Andrew W. Swaney, 7-28 Register. 1910, made liomestead entry, No. 02113, for Lot 1, Sec. 30, Township 23 N. Range 20 W., Montana Meridian, lias liled notice of intention to mako Final commutation proof, lo estab­ lish claim to the land above described, before Frank C. Hailey, a United Stales Commissioner, al Poison, Mon­ tana, on the 7th day of August, 1911. Claimant names as witnesses: Aug­ ust Mangels, Ciaus Erickson, Alfred iles and Thomas 1>. Bare, all of Pol son, Montana. (Not Coal Land) Andrew W. Swaney, 0-30 Register. Notice For Publication Department of the Interior, U. S. Land Ollice a t Kalispell Montana, July 31, 1911. Notice is hereby given that Fred M. Deskins, of Poison, Montana, who, on May 21,1910, made Homestead entry, No. 02073, for N. W. i N. W. i, W. i of W. i of N. E. i of NW. i and S. W. i N. W. i, Section 29, Township 22N.,Range20 W , Montana Meridian, lias liled notice of intention to make Final commutation Proof, to establish claim to the land above described, be fore Frank C. Bailey, a United States Commissioner, at Poison, Montana, on the 12th day of September, 1911. Claimant names as witnesses: George Thompson, Virgil Holding, Jesse Connerly and John W. Fuller, all of Poison Montana. (Not Coal Land) Andrew. W. Swaney 8 - 4 Register SHERIFF’S SALE. m a n n e r and his courteous, almost . learning these folks some lessons,\ he servile dem eanor tow ard his employ er’s custom e rs would ordinarily nt tract the attention of a business man. H e welcomed n sudden acceleration of b u siness now. He transacted trivial m a tters with a crispness and courtesy th a t m ade MI bb P o rter and Jimmy open their innocent eyes. H e darted Bald, w itb an affected nasal draw l. | Then they led him away. | It w as Jim m y , the office boy, who ! b roke the ghastly silence th a t fol­ lo w e d his w ithdraw a l. I “1 guess I better dust up Mr. Dick- Ron’s office.” he said virtuously. “He'll bo pretty busy tho next few dnys, nnd from telephone Io ledger and from ^ somebody’s got to be on to the job.\ George II. Thompson, Plaintiff, against Gretrude W. Curtis, Clarence A. Curtis, Strit/.el Spaberg Lumber Co., a corporation, F. L. Gray Co.. a corporation, Poison House Furnish­ ing Co., and J. A. Trow, defendants. To be sold a t Sheriff’s Sale: On the 2nd day of September A. D. 1911, a t Two o’clock p. m. at the front door of tiie Court House, in tlie city of Kalis­ pell, County of Flatliead, State of Montana, to tiie highest and best bid der for casli in hand, tiie following described real estate lying and being in tlie County of Flatliead and State of Montana. All the Right, Title and Interest of the above named defend­ ants in tlie following described prop­ erty, to wit: Lot Ten, (10) ol Block Seven, (7*) of the Government Town­ site of Poison, in Flatliead County, State of Montana, according to the Government Plat thereof. Together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise ap­ pertaining. Dated tliis 7th day of August, A. D. 1911. A. J. Ingraham, Sheriff ot Flatliead County, Montana. 8-11 By T. Clifford, Deputy Sheriff. Now is the time to buy Harness and wagon while you have agood stock to select from. L. Holding & Son ATTENTION! Appendicitis, Tumors and otlier dis­ eases cured witiiout tlie use of the surgeons knife or drugs. Scientilie spinal adjustment. All eye trouble treated. Drs. Dinwiddie, Neim>-0|- thalmologist. Over Darrel's grocery, Poison. Notice For Publication. Department of tlie Interior, U. S. Land Ollice, at Kalispell, Montana, August 3rd, 1911. Notice is hereby given th a t William B. Baggett, of Poison, Montana, who on May 115th, 1910, made liomestead Entry, No. 02008, for NWi NEi, NE-j NW | Unit “A” Section 35, Township 22, N, Range 21 W., Montana Meridian, has tiled notice of intention to make F i­ nal Commutation Proof, to establish claim to tiie land above described, be- for Frank C. Bailey, a United States Commissioner, at Poison, Montana, on tlie 18lh day of September, 1911. Claimant names at witnesses: Fred M. Deskin, Edward Kelley, James Van Horn and George Thompson, all of Poison, Montana. (Not Coal Land) Andrew VV. Swaney, 8-11 Register. NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION Department of the Interior, U. S. Land . Office at Kalispell, Montana, Augusta, 1911. Notice is Iiereby given tliat Bernhard Gottlieb, of Poison, Montana, who, on May 28tli, 1910, made Homestead Entry, No. 021G5, for S. i N. W. i and N. i S. W. i, Section 15, Township 22 N., Range 22 W., Montana Meridian, lias'tiled notice of intention lo make F inal Commutation Proof, to establish claim to tlie land above described, before Frank C. Bailey a United States Commissioner, a t Poison, Montana, on tlie 19th day of September, 1911. Claimant names as witnesses: Ar­ thur G. Moon, Louis K. Pool, John M. Smith and A rthur D. Maynard all o£ Poison, Montana. (Not Coal Land) Andrew W. Swaney, 8-11 Register. NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION Departm ent of the Interior, U. S. Land Ollice at Kalispell, Montana, July 10,1911. Notice is hereby given that Louis E. Cunningham, of Poison, Montana, who, on May 20th, 1910, made Homestead Entry, No. 02004, for S. E. i N. E. i, N. E. i S. E. i (Unit “E ” ,) Section 29, Township 22 N. Range 21 W., Montana Meridian, has liled notice ol intention to make i ’inal Commutation Prooiyto establish claim to tiie land above described, before Register and Receiver, U. S. Land Of­ fice at Kalispell, Montana, on tlie 24th day of August, 1911. Claimant names as witnesses: Lafay­ ette S. Coleman, Eugene Desarmo, D. A. Cubbage and John W. Fuller, all of Poison, Montana. (Not Coal Laud) Andrew W. Swaney, 7-14 Register Notice For Publication Departm ent of tlie Interior, tf. St Land Ollice at Kalispell, Montana, J uiy Oth, 1911. Notice is hereby given tliat Wilson F. Millar, of Poison Mon* tana, who, on May 4th, 1910, made Homestead entry, No. 0.1887, for S. E. i N. W. i, S. W. i N. E. i, N. W. i S. E. i and Lot 3, Section 1, Township 22 N., Range21 W., Montana Meridian, has liled notice of intention to make Final Commutation Proof, to establish claim to tlie land above described, before Frank C. Bailey, a United States Commissioner, at Poison, Mon­ tana, on Lhe 21st day ot' August, 1911. Claimant names as witnesses: John T. Foulkes, Louis J. Schwartz, Ern­ est E. MeKelvey and Isaac S. Hedrick all of Poison, Montana. (Not Coal Land) Andrew W. Swaney, 7-14 Register. ----------- ---------------- Notlco For Publication Department of tlie Interior, IT. S. Land Ollice at Kalispell, Montana, J uly 10,1911. Notice is Iiereby given that Luella J. Linton, of Poison, Flat­ head County Montana, who, on May 21, 1910, made Homestead entry, No. 02092, for Farm Unit “G” N. W. i N. W. i, Section 35 and S. W .iS.W . i, Section 20, Township 22 N., Range 21 W., Montana Meridian, lias tiled notice of intention to made Final Commuta­ tion Proof, to establish claim to the iand above described before Register and Receiver, U. S. Land Otlice at Kalispell, Montana, on the 24tli day of August, 1911. Claimant names as witnesses: Char* les AV. Blomburg, Abraham II. Hud­ son, Marvel Tarr and 'William F. Berry, all of Poison, Montana. (Not Coal Land) Andrew W. Swaney, 7-14 Register.

The Flathead Courier (Polson, Mont.), 11 Aug. 1911, located at <http://montananewspapers.org/lccn/sn86075296/1911-08-11/ed-1/seq-3/>, image provided by MONTANA NEWSPAPERS, Montana Historical Society, Helena, Montana.