The Flathead Courier (Polson, Mont.) 1910-current, November 19, 1936, Image 5

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Thursday, November 19, 1936 THE FLATHEAD COURIER. Pelson, Montana PAGE FMI News Items From Co. Agent's Office 48 Range Applications Considerable more applications for the range part of the soil conservation program have been received than was anticipated according to a statement from County Agent Paisley, who is sec- retary of the organization. No applica- tions have been received within the last week and it would seem that forty-eight applications will be the maximum for the county. Demonstrator at Pablo Miss Josephine Polock demonstrated before delegates from eight Womens' Extension clubs at Pablo on Wednesday of this week on the subject of \Making of Cuffs. Moccasins, and Otherwise Re- modeling the Wardrobes.\ The delegates will put on the demonstration at their various clubs at the next regular meet- ing. Two other demonstrations will be given by Miss Pollock in March and in May of 1937. County Champion County Agent J. C. Paisley has re- ceived a handsome gold medal from State Club Leader R. E. Cameron to be presented to Fern Rogers county cham- pion in the Food Preservation contest which the Kerr Glass company spon- sors among the 1,000,000 club members of the nation through the National committee on boys and girls club work of Chicago. Pablo Community Mr. and Mrs. Lee Brener of Missoula spent the week end at the Stimson home. Mrs. John Hogan of Round Butte anent Sunday at the Stimson home. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Detrick made a trip to Kalispell over the week end. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Sanders and Raymond Sanders spent several days with Mr. and Mrs. Bill Sanden of Marion. Mrs. Emma Hanunons and M. L. Doering of Plains called at the Stimson home Saturday evening. Charlie Ingraham and Roy Lovell re- turned from a successful trip. They had one deer. Clarence and Ray Randen were suc- cessful getting - a deer at Marion last Sunday. Robert Fletcher, Jr., John Mullen and John McDonald. university students, were Saturday dinner guests at the Mayer home. Miss Kathleen Keller is spending the week at the Hans Nelson home. Mr. and Mrs. Blair Barnes of D'Aste spent Monday at the Hans Nelson home. Mr. Westerman had the misfortune to fall on the highway and fracture his right wrist Evelyn Cole is on the sick list this week. There was a good attendance at the P. T. A. meeting. Everyone is urged to attend and help a worthy cause. Richard Carlysle is employed at Monday morning Walt and Jinks Dietrick received word of the death of their father at Portland, Ore. The com- munity extends their sympathy. Adelen Matt was in Poison on busi- ness Wednesday. In Lake 40 Years Age Frank Rumble of Heppner. Ore.. was In Poison last week visiting and look- ing after business. He is one of the earliest inhabitants of what is now Lake county, locating at Pablo about 40 years ago. Mr. Rumble remains much inter- ested in this part of Montana and keens In contact with it thru the weekly visits of The Courier. Round Butte Clifford Beck, Al Jackson and Dr. Granger and daughter from Butte were week end guests at the L. M. Beck home. John Hogan returned from Spokane Tuesday. He took two carloads of beef to the market for various farmers. Mrs. Askel Jager is recovering satis- factorily from a major operation per- formed at the St. Patrick hospital in Missoula. Miss Elizabeth Levis assisted at the Safeway store in Ronan the past week. L. Catlin of Missoula was a house guest at the F. G. Ards home the past week. Mrs. Fred Stratton entertained at a chain party at her home Tuesday. Those who enjoyed the afternoon were Mesdames VanNess, Ed. Bartell, Albert Fisher, A. F. Fisher, J. B. Kiracofe, Leverich, Alfred, and Mrs. Weistaner, Rose Gorshe, Mrs. John Kinnick and Mrs. F. Blumhagen. A bounteous lunch was served. Mrs. Hugh Elmore's mother, Mrs. B. Thompson of Missoula visited at the Elmore home last Friday. Mr. and Mrs. C. McMillan and Glen Emerson motored to Spokane Sunday. Oscar Bakken is spending a few days in Spokane. \PEPPER\ TO BE SHOWN AT LAKE 'THEATRE THANKSGIVING DAY Although Irvin S. Cobb is one of the literary world's highest paid writers, his first Job on a newspaper paid him the princely salary of $1.75 per week. Inci- dentally. Cobb, featured with Slim Summerville in Jane Withers' new hit, \Pepper did not sell his first short story until he was thirty-seven years old. \Pepper\ will be shown at the New Lake Thanksgiving day in connection with bank nite. With The Churches Poison Lutheran Church Sunday School and Young People's Bible Class at 9:45. The Bible class meets at the parsonage. Divine worship at 11 a. m., the Girls Chorus will furn- ish special music. The Bible Class has now been put on an accredited basis making it possible for the students in the class to receive high school credit. The pastor teaches the course and ex- tends an invitation to the young peo- ple of high school age. The Ladies aid will hold its annual bazaar and food sale next Saturday at Grinde's store. Thanksgiving Day summons all people to recall the mercies of God, to think of Him as the Giver of all, and to ex- press their grateful thanks in words of praise. We invite everyone to join us In an hour of worship on Thanksgiving Day. Services at 10:30 with special music. Rev. E. S. Ede, pastor. Methodist Church W. P. Jinnett, minister. Morning worship and pastor's message at 11 a. m. Theme \The Greatest of Them All.\ Church school under the leadership of , Miss Elaine Erther at ten o'clock. Vas. pers at 7;30 p. m. A iwippy song servici with the great old and new hymmt. Brief sermonic discussion of the sub' ject: \I Was Converted.\ Mid -week ser- vice for prayer and testimony on Wed- nesday evenings at 7:30. The follow- ing thirty -minute prayer meetings are announced for Friday morning at 10: Mrs. Marcissa Redd, Mrs. Lie E. White, Mrs. E. B. Powell. Attend the one near- est you. Christian Science 418 Fourth Street. Sunday services at 11 a. in. Sunday school at 9:45 a. m. Wednesday evening meeting at 8:00. Thanksgiving services, November 26, at 11 a. in. Subject for November 22, Soul and Body. Golden Text Matthew 8:22. Enjoy America's Greatest Feast Day With Us! Thanksgiving Dinner $1.00 Crisp Celery Green, Ripe Olives Pineapple Sherbet Cranberry Sauce Mixed Fruit Cocktail or Fresh Oyster Cocktail Cream of Tomato Soup Moulded Vegetable Salad, Mayonnaise Choice of Baked Stuffed Young Turkey, Giblet Dressing Special T -Bone Steak , Roast Domestic Goose, Glazed Apples Fried Fresh Mission Range Rainbow Trout Whipped Potatoes Candied Sweet Potatoes Buttered Whole Kernel Corn Hot Whole Wheat Parker House Reins Pecan Crunch Ice Cream Fruit Cake Pumpkin Pie Whipped (Warn Hot Mince Meat Pie Plum Pudding Brandy Sauce Tea Milk , Coffee Mints Salted Nuts Salish House IThe light of the body is the eye? if therefore thine eye be shigle, thy whole body shall be full of light. The public is cordially invited to these services. Pablo Lutheran (Mo. Synod) \We preach a Changeless Christ for a Changing World.\ 10:15 Sunday school; 11:00 English service. The Ladies aid sale at the clubhouse this Saturday, Nov. 21. Dinner will be served. John Bundschuh, pastor. First Baptist Church Sunday school at 10, preaching at 11; evening' service at 7:30; devotional and Bible Study Thursday, 7 p. m. Two new members were added last Sunday, mak- ing a total of nine additions during the present pastorate. Services Thanks- giving day at 11 o'clock, to be followed by a basket dinner. Members and friends please take notice. Christian Church Bible school at 10 o'clock. Communion services 11 o'clock every Sunday morn- ing. Baptist-Presbyterian Church Clifton W. Trio], pastor. Sunday school at 10 a. m., Church service at 11. Subject In Everything Give Thanks.\ Young People's meeting 7 p. m. Mrs. Triol will give a talk on \The Language and Customs of China.\ She will wear the Chinese costume. Everyone welcome. Tuesday, Nov. 25, meeting of Sunday school teachers and officers at 7:30 p. m. Wednesday, Nov. 26, mid -week ser- vice at 7:30. Thursday, Nov. 27, Thanks- giving service. We will worship with our Lutheran friends at their church at 10:30 a. m. Rev. Ede will conduct the service. Civil Service Exam There will be a civil service exam for the purpose of filling a vacancy in Glacier National park, at Belton, for telephone -radio operator. Additional information may be secured from the local postoff ice. RACING JOCKEYS HAVE MANY SUPERSTITIONS SAYS MOVIE MAN Race track jockeys are Just about the most superstitious group in the world. Warner Oland has decided. During the filming of \Charlie Chan at the Race Track,\ Twentieth Century- Fox picture coming to the Lake theatre soon, Oland, who plays the role of Charley Chan, became interested in the jockeys working in the production and unearthed a number of curious super- stitions in which they believe. In addition to black cats, walking Under steps ladders and broken mir- rors, all of which are taboo to the jockeys, Oland discovered several other usual omens in which they believe. They are: A Jockey will never have his picture taken before a race. He never lends a stickpin to another rider. He will never wear another jockey's attire, no matter what emergency may arise. He will never race astride a strange saddle. FINANCIAL REPORT, ST. PETERS FOOTBALL GAME SHOWS DEFICIT Considered from an interest stand- point the St. Peters -Poison game left nothing to be desired. Financially, the athletic treasury shows a dellict of $20. Receipts were as follows: donated by businessmen, $62.50; advance sale at 5Dc per ticket, 827.50; gate receipts, $30.50. Expenses: guarantee to St. Peters $100; officials, 629.00; miscellaneous (lime, advertising, ball, etc) $11.50. The total expenses being 4140.50 with re- ceipts of only $120.50, the deficit being taken out of the athletic treasury. Prof. White states that they are not feeling bad over the finances however as they usually have a much larger shortage than this one, on the big football games where expenses run un- usually high. SHOWS EVERYDAY Eve. 7 and 9 p. m. Mat., Sat, and Sun. 1:30 11. m. Prices: 15e 25e 35c Get the \LAKE HABIT\ -new comfort -entertainment FRIDAY - SATURDAY GOOD? -They're Downright Funny JOE E. BROWN as the natural born Super Salesman -Selling something big and it is BIG 'Earthworm Tractors\ also \ARIZONA RAIDERS\ --It's a 2 -Hit Program SUNDAY - MONDAY IS IT CHINA -YET TODAY? IT'S MODERN Adolph Zu•or •••••00• GARY MAOILIIINO COOPER CARROLL THE GENERAL AP DIED at DAWN* TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY TWO NEW HIT FEATURES -Don't Miss These Winners -- AIMED STRAHISIT AT YOU! NIARY1 HERE MARRY II. GOETZ tossitata THEY Mrs Fmr• Casper's Maio 1 7 4, tiv T i t o f ‘(\.47 1 :‘411 ‘ 0 01 ( 1A S Randolph SCOTT Binnie BARNES Henry WILC'D'eN A. EDWARD SMALL lrnduction tialkuuri Nein. • Salooted . . 1 / 4 ;it 0 421 . 0115 COME! Down The Stretch' A boy and a horse...out- casts-ride to glory in the greatest thrill since \Broadway Etill\! PATRICIA ELLIS MICKEY ROONEY THURSDAY ONLY - IT'S BANK NITE And Bank Nite-Big Money FREE PRI. - SAT., Nov. 27-28. W. C. FIELDS in \Poppy\ with Rochelle Hudson I The \Kama Kid\ kicks tis0 with AM MINIM - new Incas saa a Fond assesass. More Laughs - Thrills PRESIDENTIAL VOTE BY STATES President Franklin Delano Roosevelt swept to re-election on the crest of the largest -wave of votes, both popular and electoral, ever cast for a Presidential candidate, it was apparent with 105,251 districts reported out of a total of 122,772 in the United States. The table below shows the number of districts reporting in each state, the popular vote, the electoral vote and the winner's plurality in each state. Pluralities are estimated, since in most cases Complete returns will not be available for some time: Indicated Diets. ,.- Popular Vote----, Plurality in Klett. Vote STATE Rptd. Roosevelt . Landon Lemke Dist, Rptd, RvIt. Ldn. Alabama . . 1.160 149.023 ,•• 22,960 56 126.063 11 . • Arizona . . . 424 83,256 \ 1 ' 32.326 3,070 50,930 3 •. Arkansas . . 971 74.042 16.291 5 57,731 9 California . . 9,752 1,391.862 656,057 735,825 22 Colorado . . . 1,222 209.911 135.339 2,795 74,$72 6 Connecticut • . 169° 381,374 278,110 23,502 103,264 8 Delaware . . 232 0 69,996 54.409 15,557 3 Florida • • • 1,131 213.219 68,530 144.689 7 Georgia . . .,,, 1,574 223,666 33,978 109 194.688 12 Idaho . . • • 735 120,098 64,760 3.702 55.338 4 Illinois • • • 7 • 805 2.244,342 1.527,566 69,572 716,776 29 I ndians • . . 3,745 902,369 666,769 11,212 235,600 14 Iowa . . • . 2,321 579,096 457,699 13.593 121.397 II Kansas • . . 2,611 419.789 366,970 52,819 9 •• Kentucky . • 3,747 461.184 318.143 143.041 .11 Louisiana . . 150 73.625 7,545 66.030 10 Main. „ . . 621 124.593 166,969 7,315 42,1662 Maryland . . 1,447 387,125 229,125 158,000 11 MaisSchniettS • 1,765* 941,701 760.214 120,733 181,487 17 Michigan . . 3,336 965,964 669,83/ 58,214 296,126 PI Minnesota . . 2,900 539.148 273,133 53.666 263,995 II Mississippi . . 147 21.683 713 20,970 9 Missouri • • • 4.310 1.093,090 687,756 8,736 410,314 1: .. I Montana . . . 468 79,531 29,042 1.214 50,489 .. t Nebraska . . 2,001 336,263 238,324 12.2411 97,941 7 Nevada . . . 202 20,307 8.119 12,188 3 New Jersey . 3,575 1,0793116 711,206 368,710 146 New Hampshire 295. :satin 103,626 3.523 2.595 New Mexico . 723 90,757 51,377 30 39,380 New York . . 8.926 3,257,349 2,149033 1,108.316 47 North Carolina . 1,312 465,541 132.695 332,1144 13 North Dakota . 764 65.877 30,527 11.840 35,330 4 Ohio . . . . 8,515 1,695,645 1,100,200 123.625 595,445 26 Oklahoma . . 2,874 416,830 200,291 216.539 II Oregon . . . 1,228 154,050 78.623 12.673 75.457 5 Pennsylvania . 7,919 2,324,934 1,681,323 48,266 643,611 36 Rhoda Island . 343• 166,667 124,816 18,201 41,831 South Carolina . 700 83,9/1 1.346 82,641 . 4 3 SOuth Dallota . 1,241 103,952 82,945 2,536 21,007 Tennessee . . 2,036 308,312 131,510 • 168 176,802 11 Teats t . . . . 315 420,484 57,212 1,385 363,272 3 4 3 Utah . • . . 756 143.659 63,912 436 79.747 Vermont • • . 241I• 62,149 10,960 116/1114 --. 3 Virginia . • . 1,660 233,391 96,723 162 136.661 11 Washington . 1,885 254,962 121,133 3,570 133,129 1 West Virginia . 1,940 429,849 277,086 152.763 Wisconsin , . 2,789 754,532 366,676 53,425 393.656 12 Wyoming . . 488 45,675 26,646 17,029 6 •.•;6•A., • 105,251 24.773,018 15,447,771 671,384 10.000.0007 523 t„. • Complete I Landon Plurality I Estimated total plurality when all returns are in. Party Line -Ups in 10 Congresses 5061100 nieetsgarvartves III OA 71 'i ill II 66\ 67\ 6r for ltr 76\ 7r . 71\ 74\ 75' RCPUSLICON E=3 Dr WM' I. • 66\ 67\ Gr 69\ 7 0\ 71' MN This chart shows how Republicans and Democrats will share seats In both houses of seventy-fifth congress, as compared with nine preceding congresses. Election Sets a New Record With 43,000,000 Votes Cast p RESIDENT ROOSEVELT, elected to a second term by a greater plurality than any candidate has ever enjoyed in the past, finds himself now with perhaps more power than has • ever before been trusted to any man in the world. He polled some 25,500,000 popular votes, to set a new all-time record. Gov. Alf M. Landon of Kansas, his Republican opponent, was a bit shy of 16,000,000, while William Lemke, the Union party candidate, polled about three -fourths of a million. These results were haqed upon* 107,309 districts reported out of the the Democratic majority in both 122,722 in the United Slates. it 3•85 houses of congress. estimated that the total vote. with The senate in the Seventy-fifth all districts reported. wild spprox- congress will find the Democrats imate 43,000.000 also a new all-tirne with 75 of the 98 seats, outnumber - record, ing the opposition more than 4 to 1. •The American people, providing The house of ,representatives. where the incumbent Democratic cindi- the Republicans had hoped to re date with 523 votes in the electors cover as much as 125 seats, will see college to 8 for Governor Landon, the Democrats even stronger than also voiced their approval of the before, holding 334 seats against 84 New Deal by materially increasing for the G. 0. P. • Here ' s How Parties ci Line Up in Congress With smashing Democratic victo- ries all down the line, this is the way the houses of the Seventy -111th con - tress will line up, as compared with the Seventy-fourth congress. The next house of representatives: Democrats 334 Republicans 89 Progressives 7 Farmer -Laborites 5 Total 435 The last house of representatives lined up as follows: Democrats 321 Republicans 104 Progressives 7 Farmer -Laborites 3 The senate of the Seventy-fifth congress will And the seats distrib- uted this way: Democrats 75 Republicans • 17 Progressives 1 Independent 1 Farmer -Labor 2 Total 96 The party alignment in the old senate was: Democrats 70 Republicans 23 Farmer -Labor 2 Progressive 1 THE VOTE IN 1932 Demo STATE Roosevelt Alabama . 207.910 Arison• . 79.264 Ark . 189.602 California 1.324.157 Colorado . 250,277 Conner t i cut 281.632 Dalswart 54,319 Florida . 206.307 Gsorgi • . 734.118 Idaho 109,479 Illinois . 1,682.304 Indiana . 862.014 Iowa . 099,018 Kansas • 474.204 Kentucky 580.574 Louisiana 249,414 Maine . . 121,007 Maryland 314,314 Ilaasacbuselts /00,14/1 Michigan , 671,700 Mimeo:Am 600.106 Missiseippl 140,161 Missouri . 1,015.406 Montana . 127,286 Nebraska . 359,012 Nevada , 28.756 N.. , Hamper 100,010 New Jereiay 806,630 Nam Meek* 95,019 New York 2,534,959 N. Carolina 497,566 North Dakota 171,350 Ohio . . 1,301.695 Oklahoma 316.4611 Orsgoa . 213,871 Pennsyrnia 1,295.948 Rhode Island 146,004 S. Carolina 102,347 South Dakota 183,511 Tennessee 239.473 Teats • . 760,341 Utah . . 116,750 Vinson t • 36.266 Virgieia . 203,979 Washington 333.260 W. Virginia 403,124 Wiacontlit 707,410 Wronging 34.399 Repub. Social'at Hoover Thomas 34,675 2.030 36,104 2.618 28,467 1.261 147,902 63,299 189,617 13.591 288,420 20.440 $7,073 1,376 61,170 es 19,863 461 71.312 524 1,432,756 67.231 677,184 21.388 414,453 20,467 349,4116 14.274 344.716 5.853 16.851 166.631 3,480 184,184 10,419 736,991 34.265 739,194 39,205 363,951/ 05.479 5.110 486 364.713 16.374 78,071 7,191 201.177 9,171 12,674 103,629 947 773.664 42.906 34,217 1.778 1,937,963 177.397 201,344 3,391 71,772 3,321 1,227.679 64,004 180,165 156,019 15,450 1.453,540 91,119 115,266 kin 1,9/8 113 99.212 1,331 133,723 LING 97.939 4.450 84.791 4,087 71,9/4 1,585 89,637 2.310 2011,645 17.00 330,731 5,11811 347.741 53,370 31,383 2.829 Ruth Stevens, Prop. Poison, Mont. • Total Vote Grows The total vote in the 1936 election surpassed that of four years before by more than 3,000.000. Totals . 316821.313 11,761.717 104.274

The Flathead Courier (Polson, Mont.), 19 Nov. 1936, located at <http://montananewspapers.org/lccn/sn86075296/1936-11-19/ed-1/seq-5/>, image provided by MONTANA NEWSPAPERS, Montana Historical Society, Helena, Montana.